Vintage Cameras

In early 2013, my daughter and I were looking at an old Agfa Billy I had picked up in a Belgian flea market years ago, and a Kodak Six20 my other daughter had bought at a yard sale, and she wondered whether it would be possible to take photos with either of them. Next thing you know, I was bidding on old cameras on eBay, and we’ve had fun learning how to use them, discovering how they work, and seeing if they still do!

If you are searching for a particular camera, they are sorted first by manufacturer (alphabetically), and then by first year of manufacture.

Agfa Ansco No 1A Readyset SpecialAgfa-Ansco No. 1A Readyset Special – 1925-1931, uses 116 rollfilm.  Covered in brown leather made to look like ostrich.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | lens closeup | angled view
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr set | blog post

Agfa Billy Compur ca 1934-42Agfa Billy Compur – 1934-1942, uses 120 rollfilm.  Purchased on eBay. Blog post
– Photos of the camera: front view | close-up of lens
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr set

Agfa A8 Cadet circa 1937-1940

Agfa A8 Cadet – 1937-1940, uses A-8 (127) rollfilm.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:  front view
– Photos made with the camera: blog post | Flickr set

Ansco B2 Cadet

Agfa-Ansco B2 Cadet – 1937/8, uses B-2 (120) rollfilm.  The cool thing about this particular camera is that it came to me with an exposed roll of b/w film still inside.  I’m looking forward to see if it is salvageable.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view 1 | front view 2
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set
Camera Manual

Agfa Billy IAgfa Billy I – 1950, uses 120 rollfilm.  This is the one that started it all for us!  Purchased at a flea market in Belgium. Blog post.
– Photos of the camera:  front view | close-up of lens
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr set | blog post
Camera Manual

Agfa Billy Record IAgfa Billy Record I – 1950-1952, uses 120 rollfilm. This one is in very nice shape.
– Photos of the camera:  front view | close-up of lens
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set | blog post

Agfa Silette Rapid F

Agfa Silette Rapid F  – 1964, uses 35mm rollfilm cartridges developed to be competitive with the Kodak Instamatic’s 126 film.  Given to me as a birthday gift by my daughter.
– Photos of the camera:  front view 
Photos made with the camera: Flickr set | blog post

Aires 35 VAires 35 V – 1958, 35mm.  A well-designed, solid rangefinder from a Japanese company that went bankrupt in 1960, after 10 years of existence.  The 35 V was offered with a variety of lenses; this one has the brilliant f/1.5 40mm lens and an f/3.5 100mm lens.
– Photos of the camera: angled view | front view | lens close-up | with additional lens
– Photos made with the camera: blog post | Flickr album
– Camera Manual

Anthony & Scovill Ansco No. 2 Box CameraAnthony & Scovill Ansco No. 2 – 1903-1906; used 3 1/4 by 4 1/4 rollfilm type 118.  A huge box camera with wooden insides about which there is not a whole lot of information on the net.  The camera has almost no markings, and I only figured out what it was (I think) by looking up the (very faint) patent numbers on the inside back cover.  In 1907, after this “Ansco box” was no longer being made, the company renamed itself as “Ansco.”  Given as a gift from my mother.
– Photos of the camera: front view | angled view
– (Photos made with the camera – I’m sure I’ll figure something out)

Agfa Karomat 36Ansco Karomat – 1948 – mid-1950s, uses 35mm cartridge film.  The Ansco Karomat was the Agfa Karat 36 re-badged for the American market.  The Karat was the final model in a line of cameras produced from the 1930s onward, and the 36/Karomat was the first to abandon the rapid cartridge for the 35mm cartridge.   In 1953, it sold for $164US (over $1200 in 2007 US dollars – these were not cheap cameras!).  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera: blog post | Flickr album
Camera Manual

Ansco Shur-Shot Jr.Ansco Shur-Shot Jr – 1948, uses 120 rollfilm.  Purchased on eBay.  This one is in almost pristine shape.  In terms of construction, it appears identical to the Ansco B2 listed above – just a bit more decorative.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr album | blog post

Ansco ReadyflashAnsco Readyflash – 1950s, uses 620 rollfilm.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:  front view
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr album | blog post

Ansco RegentAnsco Regent – 1953, uses 35mm film.  Purchased on eBay, with leather case.
– Photos of the camera: angled front view
– Photos made with the camera: blog post | Flickr set
– Camera manual

Ansco Anscoflex

Ansco Anscoflex – 1953-1956, uses 620 rollfilm.  Purchased on eBay, with a roll of film inside it included!  Here’s an interesting link about its history.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera:  found film | blog post | Flickr set
– Camera manual | disassembly and cleaning

Argus / Argus / Argoflex Seventy-FiveArgoflex Seventy-Five – 1949-1958, uses 620 rollfilm and uses a large, top-mounted brilliant finder to frame pictures.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angled front view (Argoflex) | angled front view
Photos made with the camera
Camera manual

Berkey Keystone 310 Everflash – 1970s.  Little information available on this compact camera everyone who lived through the 1970s remembers seeing.  If you go to Lomography.com you can even see photos taken with this camera.  Mine came with a roll of film inside it which I have yet to develop (110 film is tricky!)

Canon FTbCanon FTb – 1971-1973, 35mm SLR.  I got this one on eBay in a lot of 12 cameras, but it came without a lens.  I’d like to get an FD L lenses for it, but they are highly sought after and run in the hundreds of dollars.  Instead, I have this Soligor macro lens.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set
Camera manual
Camera review

Canon AF35M IICanon AF35SM II – 1983 35mm camera which included a number of innovations by Canon.  While walking on the beach in India taking photos with an old camera, I was approached by an Indian man who wanted to give me two film cameras he was no longer using – this was one of them.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera:

Unknown Franka Werke CameraFranka Werke, unknown model.  Believed to be a Rollfix, 1939, or possibly a Bonafix.  Uses 120 film.  The shutter sticks at all but 1/100 speed. Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | lens close-up
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr album | blog post

Franka Werke BonafixFranka Werke Bonafix – believed to be around 1950. Uses 120 film.  Pristine condition, other than a bit of fungus. Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angled front view | front view | lens close-up
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set | blog post

Folding Ensign 3 1/4AHoughton Ltd. Folding Ensign 3 1/4A – c. 1912, uses 122 film. Oddly large early folding camera (nearly a foot tall, lengthwise) made in the UK circa 1912.  This one appears to be in full working order, though testing it will be a challenge as it uses a much larger format than is currently in production – basically the size of a postcard.
– Photos of the camera: front view | lens close-up
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr set

Ensign CommandoBarnet-Ensign Ltd Ensign Commando – 1949, uses 120mm film with a built-in mask that allows for 12 or 16 exposures.  Rangefinder which is focused by moving the film plane, not the lens.  See also this site.
– Photos of the camera: front view in cover | front view | closed view
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr album | blog post

Imperial Insta-Flash 126Imperial Insta-Flash 126 – Not much information on this one.  Has an undevelopable roll of Kodachrome 126 inside.
– Photos of the camera: front view

No. 1A Pocket Folding Kodak No. 1A Folding Pocket Kodak – 1905-1906, uses 116 rollfilm.  This camera came in multiple versions – this is the “Model B” with red bellows.
– Photos of the camera: front view lens close-up | angled view
– Photos made with the camera:

No. 1A Pocket Folding Kodak No. 1A Folding Pocket Kodak – 1906-1912, uses 116 rollfilm.  This camera came in multiple versions – this is the “Model D” with red bellows, which narrows the range of years this camera could have been manufactured.  It’s different in that its lens pops right off for some reason, and its insides are mainly made of wood – to include the original film spool, still present.
– Photos of the camera: front view | angled view
– Photos made with the camera:

No. 1A Folding Hawk-Eye Model 1No. 1A Folding Hawk-Eye Model 1 – 1908-1912, uses 116 rollfilm.
– Photos of the camera: front view | lens close-up
– Photos made with the camera:

No. 3A Folding Pocket Kodak Model B-4No. 3A Folding Pocket Kodak Model B-4 – June 1908-April 1909, uses 122 “postcard” size )3.25 by 5.5 inch) film.  One of a series of No. 3A Folding Pocket Kodaks made between 1903 and 1915.  You’d have needed pretty large pockets.  Depending on the lens and shutter, original price ranged from $20.00 to $78.00.  Gift from my parents.
– Photos of the camera:  front view | angled view | lens close-up
– Photos made with the camera: film found inside

Kodak Premo Jr no 1 Model B

 Kodak Premo Junior No. 1 Model B – 1909-1913, uses 520 film packs.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:  front view
(Photos made with the camera)
Camera manual

No. 2A Folding Pocket BrownieNo. 2A Folding Pocket Brownie – 1910-1915, uses 116 rollfilm.  Serial number 57635 with red bellows makes this a model made in roughly 1912.  In great shape and should still work OK but hasn’t been tested.
– Photos of the camera: front view | lens close-up
– Photos made with the camera: blog post | Flickr album
Camera manual

No. 1A Folding Pocket Kodak, R.R. Lens TypeNo. 1A Folding Pocket Kodak, R.R. Lens Type – 1912-1915, uses 116 rollfilm.  Serial number 98585-S, black bellows, likely 1914/5.  Missing autographic stylus and leather handle, some metal corrosion, but shutter still fires.
– Photos of the camera: angled view | lens close-up |front view
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr album | blog post

Kodak No. 2 Hawkeye Model C Box CameraKodak Hawk-Eye No. 2 Model C – 1913, uses 120 rollfilm.  A cardboard/leatherette box camera, the No. 2 was made by Kodak after taking over the Blair Camera Company, which made the No. 1 in the late 1800s.  Later reissued as the 50th Anniversary Edition in 1930. Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:  angled front view
– Photos made with the camera:  blog post | Flickr album
– Camera manual

Kodak No. 0 Brownie Model ANo. 0 Kodak Brownie – 1914-1917 model (variants were made until 1935), uses 127 rollfilm.  A small cardboard/wood and box camera with a rotary shutter and two reflecting finders. It sold for $1.25 and is said to take remarkably sharp exposures, 6 by 4 cm.  Gift from my mother.
– Photos of the camera: angled top/front | angled front view | front view
– Photos made with the camera:  flickr set | blog post
– Camera manual

No. 1A Autographic Kodak JuniorNo. 1A Autographic Kodak Junior – 1914-1927, uses 116 film.  Folding camera with the autographic feature.  Serial number 105347.  Has the Kodak Anastigmat f/7.7-45 lens, Kodak ball bearing shutter, which appears to have been used in models between 1915 and 1925.  Purchased on eBay.
Photos of the camera: angled front view | lens close-up
– (Photos made with the camera)
– Camera manual

No. 2A Folding Autographic BrownieNo. 2A Folding Autographic Brownie – 1915-1926, uses 116 film. This is an update of an earlier folding Brownie, but with the autographic feature, which allows the user to use a small stylus to write details concerning the photo when taking the shot, through a small window in the back of the camera.  This one is in particularly good shape.  You can tell from some of the features, including the rounded corners of the case, that this one was manufactured in 1917 or later.  The film for this camera is no longer available, but it looks like it may be possible to use 120 film on the spare 116 spools I have – though I will lose a bit at the top and bottom.
– Photos of the camera:  lens close-up | angled side view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set
– Camera manual

Vest Pocket Kodak Autographic with shiny finishVest Pocket Autographic Kodak – 1915-1926, uses 127 film. Body number 1053829 (found on the back of the folding foot).  From the shiny enamel finish and other features of this camera, it probably dates from around 1919 or 1920.
– Photo of the camera:  angled side view
Photos made with the camera
– Camera manual part 1 | part 2
– Detailed website on Vest Pocket Kodaks

No. 2C Autographic Kodak JuniorNo. 2C Autographic Kodak Junior – 1916-1927, uses 130 rollfilm.  Serial number 183945.  Pretty common model; large, which makes the “junior” moniker a mystery.  This model with the f7.7 Anastigmat Lens cost $25 back when it was being sold new.  Appears to work but will need some modification to accept 120 film.
– Photos of the camera: angled front view | lens close-up | front view
– Photos made with the camera:

Vest Pocket Kodak (autographic)Vest Pocket Autographic Kodak – 1917-1926, uses 127 film. Purchased from a camera repair shop in Cape Town, South Africa. Body number 1237896 (found on the back of the folding foot).  “Crackle” finish cameras like this one were made 1920 and later.
– Photos of the camera:  front view | angled side view
Photos made with the camera
– Camera manual part 1 | part 2
– Detailed website on Vest Pocket Kodaks

Kodak Brownie No. 2A Model BKodak Brownie No. 2A Model B – 1920-1924 box camera that uses 116 film.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angle view
– (Photos made with the camera)
Camera manual

Vest Pocket Kodak Model BVest Pocket Kodak Model B – 1925-1934, uses 127 film, also had the autographic feature.  Seems to have been a step back from the previous model. Was also marketed as the Boy Scout Kodak and Girl Scout Kodak.  This one is in great shape for a camera this age, though I’ve been working to seal a few tiny bellows leaks, and one of the metal prongs on the bottom front has come off. Purchased on eBay
– Photos of the camera:  front view | left side | right side | lens close-up
Photos made with the camera
Camera manual

Pocket kodak No. 1Pocket Kodak No. 1 – 1922-1931 folding autographic camera that uses 120 film.  The bellows on mine are in pretty bad shape.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | angled view | lens close-up
– (Photos made with the camera)
Camera manual

Anniversary Kodak No. 2 Hawkeye Model C Box CameraKodak No. 2 Hawk-Eye 50th Anniversary Edition – 1930, uses 120 rollfilm.  To commemorate Kodak’s fiftieth anniversary, children turning 12 in 1930 were invited to come get a free camera during the month of may (while supplies lasted).  Of a total supply of 500,000 in the U.S. and another 52,000 in Canada, supposedly they were all gone in two or three days.
– Photos of the camera: front view | side view
– Photos made with the camera:  blog post (3D)

Kodak No. 2 Hawk-Eye Junior (Blue)Kodak No. 2 Hawk-Eye Junior (Blue) – 1932 box camera that uses 120 film.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angled view | front view
– (Photos made with the camera)

Kodak Six-20 Model C

Kodak Six-20 Model C – 1932-1934, uses 620 rollfilm.  Introduced by Kodak, along with the Six-16, to start using 620 film.  There were several different versions, all done in art-deco styling
– Photos of the camera: top viewfront view | lens close-up
Photos made with the camera:

Kodak Jiffy Six 20 (first series)Kodak Jiffy Six-20 – 1933-1940, uses 620 rollfilm.  Folding camera that gets its name from the ease/speed of taking a picture.  Pops open with one button and takes a picture with another.  Has two distance (focus) settings and two apertures operated by a sliding tab, f/8 and f/11; and a “time” and “instantaneous (about 1/25 second) settings.  There were two versions; the series I art deco version (this one) is much nicer, I think.  Series II are 1937 and later.
– Photos of the camera: angled front view | front view | rear view w/ original owner’s name
– (Photos made with the camera)
– Camera manual

Kodak six-20 BrownieKodak Brownie Six-20 – 1933-1941, uses 620 rollfilm.  My daughter purchased this years ago at a yard sale.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set
Camera manual

Kodak Six-16 Brownie JuniorKodak Six-16 Brownie Junior – 1934-1942, uses 616 film.  Box camera made during Kodak’s brief experiment with 116 and 616 size film.  Virtually indistinguishable from the Target Six-16. Purchased on eBay with an awesome roll of film left inside.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera | “found film” blog post
– Camera manual

Kodak Baby BrownieKodak Baby Brownie – 1934-1941, uses 127 film.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | angled side view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set
Camera manual

Kodak Retina Type 118Kodak Retina Type 118 – 1935-1936, uses 35mm film.  This was the second Kodak model to use “daytime loading film” (i.e. the film cartridges we know today) but is special in that it was the model used by Sir Edmund Hillary to photograph Tenzing Norgay at the summit of Mount Everest.  Purchased from a camera repair “shop” in Cape Town, South Africa.
– Photos of the camera: front view 1 | front view 2
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set | blog post

Kodak Senior Six-20>Kodak Senior Six-20 – 1937-1939, uses 620 rollfilm. Self erecting with two Kodak anastigmat lens options , either a f4.5 with Kodamatic shutter or a lesser quality f6.3 with a Kodex shutter. Mine has the latter. Features include a folding direct view eye-level finder, knurled winding knob, swing out film bracket and a shutter release that is located on the side of the camera. Originally priced at $20.50 for the f6.3 lens.
– Photos of the camera:  angled view | lens close-up
– (Photos made with the camera)
Camera manual (for the Senior Six-16)

Eastman Kodak Six-16 Brownie SpecialKodak Six-16 Brownie Special – 1938-1942, uses 616 rollfilm.  This camera came with a half-exposed roll of film still inside!  Here’s how that film turned out.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:  front view | angled view
– (Photos made with the camera)
Camera manual

Kodak Baby Brownie SpecialKodak Baby Brownie Special – 1938-1954, uses 127 film.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:  front view | angled side view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set

Kodak Monitor 620Kodak Monitor 620 – 1939-1948, uses 620 film. One of the most sophisticated folding cameras of the 1930s and 1940s. Purchased on eBay.  This one happened to belong to a sailor who was stationed aboard the USS New Jersey during the Korean War.
– Photos of the camera:  lens closeup | angled side view
Photos made with the camera
Camera manual

Kodak Brownie Reflex (Synchro Model)Kodak Brownie Reflex (Synchro Model) – 1941-1952, uses 127 film.  A bakelite and metal camera, fairly common, purchased because it had a roll of undeveloped film inside it.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera: blog post | Flickr set
Camera manual

Kodak Brownie Target Six-16Kodak Brownie Target Six-16 – 1946-1951, uses 616 film.  Box camera made during Kodak’s brief experiment with 116 and 616 size film. Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angled view | front view
– Photos made with the camera
– Camera manual

Kodak Brownie Target Six-20Kodak Brownie Target Six-20 – 1946-1952, uses 620 film.  Among the most common cameras; box camera that sold for $3.50.  Its predecessor, the “Target Brownie Six-20” was similar and made from 1941-46.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angled view | front view
– Photos made with the camera

Kodak Brownie HawkeyeKodak Brownie Hawkeye – 1950-1961, uses 620 film.  A bakelite camera taking 6x6cm images, made in the USA and France by Kodak between 1949 and 1961 The version with flash attachments (this one) was made from 1950 onward, while the non-flash versions stopped production around 1951.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | angled side view
Photos made with the camera: 
– Camera manual

Kodak Duaflex IIKodak Duaflex II – 1950-1954, uses 620 film.  A pseudo twin-lens reflex (TLR). Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | angled side view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr Set / blog post
Camera manual

Kodak Pony 828Kodak Pony 828 – 1949-1959, uses 828 film.  The shutter sticks for unknown reasons. Purchased on eBay.  I have a second one I have not yet tested.
– Photos of the camera: front view
(Photos made with the camera)
– Camera manual part 1 | part 2
1958 TV commercial for Kodak Pony II | Ad 2

Kodak Retina 1aKodak Retina 1a – 1949-1954, uses 35mm film.  Also known as the Type 015.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | lens close-up
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set
– Camera manual

Kodak Brownie Bulls-EyeKodak Brownie Bulls-Eye – 1954-1960, uses 620 film.  Has a focus ring and long/short exposure options, unlike many cameras in its class and time. Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
(Photos made with the camera)
Camera manual

Kodak Duaflex IVKodak Duaflex IV – 1955-ish-1960, uses 620 film.  A pseudo twin-lens reflex (TLR).  This one is in pretty lousy shape – it came with other cameras I was after – but as long as the lens and shutter still work, these old cameras tend to work forever.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | angled side view
– Photos made with the camera: 
– Camera manual

Kodak Brownie BulletKodak Brownie Bullet – 1957-1964, uses 127 film.  The Brownie Bullet is the same camera as the Brownie Holiday, except that it was given out as a promotional item, often in conjunction with purchases made from other companies.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
(Photos made with the camera)
Camera manual

Brownie Starflash Kodak Brownie StarflashKodak Brownie Starflash – 1958-1962 (the white one); 1957-1965 (the black one), uses 127 film.  The Brownie Starflash comes with a mounted flash unit that uses M2 bulbs (a bunch came with the camera) but I have not managed to get any to work.  Different AA batteries in the 60s? Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view (white) | front view (black) | box
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set (white) | Blog post (black)
– Camera manual- Starflash Camera Outfit Advertisement

Kodak Brownie StarmaticKodak Brownie Starmatic – 1959-1963, uses 127 film.  The Starmatic is unique in that it uses a photocell to set exposure, making it the first automatic Brownie.  Not clear if this one works (yet). Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angled side view
(Photos made with the camera)

Kodak Hawkeye FlashfunKodak Flashfun – 1961-1967, uses 127 film.  Appears to have been primarily given away in promotions, rather than sold (check out this ad).  Produced in various typical 1960s colors.  I bought mine with a roll of film in it, but nothing came of the film.  But here are someone else’s pictures taken with the same type of camera.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– (Photos made with the camera)

Kodak FiestaKodak Brownie Fiesta – 1962-1965, uses 127 film.  Many of these were given away as promotions, for things like buying a certain amount of Campbell’s soup; or they could apparently be bought for $5.95. Mine comes with an attached flash bulb holder; later models allowed for the use of flash cubes.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera
Camera manual

Kodak Starmite IIKodak Brownie Starmite II – 1962-1967, uses 127 film.  This particular one is in mint condition – both the box and camera are in pristine condition, with 3 of the 4 flash bulbs still remaining, as well as the original AA batteries.  Back then you didn’t just buy a camera, you bought a camera “outfit” that included everything you needed to get you started.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | in box | outside of box
– Photos made with the camera
Camera manual
– 
1960 TV commercial for the Kodak Starmite | Ad 2

Great Instructables article on the Kodak Instamatics and how you can still use them

Kodak Instamatic 104Kodak Instamatic 104 – 1963-1966, uses 126 cartridges.  One of millions of Kodak Instamatics manufactured in the 1960s and 1970s. The 104 was the model which introduced flash cubes.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– (Photos made with the camera)

Kodak Instamatic 300Kodak Instamatic 300 – 1963-1966, uses 126 cartridges.  The 300 and 400 models were higher-end instamatics.  This was the first automatic aperture instamatic, though the selenium light meter likely no longer works.  One of millions of Kodak Instamatics manufactured in the 1960s and 1970s. Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– (Photos made with the camera)

Kodak instamatic 134Kodak Instamatic 134 – 1968-1971, uses 126 cartridges.  One of millions of Kodak Instamatics manufactured in the 1960s and 1970s.  Purchased on eBay. – photos of the camera:  front view

Kodak Hawkeye Instamatic IIKodak Hawkeye Instamatic II – 1969-1975, uses 126 cartridges.  The Hawkeye Instamatic II had little in common with any of the various “Hawkeyes” produced by Kodak – instead, it appears to have been a “rebrand” of the Instamatic 44, but solely for promotional giveaways.  Purchased on eBay with a roll of film inside.
– Photos of the camera:  front view | angled view
– Photos made with the camera:  found film blog post

Kodak Instamatic X-45Kodak Instamatic X-45 – 1970-1974, uses 126 cartridges.  One of millions of Kodak Instamatics manufactured in the 1970s.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:  front view | the box

Kodak Instamatic X-35Kodak Instamatic X-35 – 1970-1976, uses 126 cartridges. One of millions of Kodak Instamatics manufactured in the 1970s.  It’s got a 41mm f/8 Kodar lens with two focus zones: two to six feet and six feet to infinity. The shutter has two speeds: 1/90 and 1/45 for flash photography.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:  front view

Kodak Instamatic X-15Kodak Instamatic X-15 – 1970-1976, uses 126 cartridges.  Purchased on eBay.  This is the model of the first camera I ever owned.  That actual camera is in better shape, but is somewhere in storage.  They also typically came with a brown vinyl zipper case.  This one came in its original box and a pamphlet “in case you need service.”  I wonder if they would honor such a request…
– Photos of the camera:  front view | in box | the box

Kodak Handle2Kodak Handle 2 – 1970s.  Kodak’s attempt at an instant camera.  Kodak had been making Polaroid’s film, and when Polaroid took over production, Kodak came out with this camera.  And in 1986, lost the lawsuit over patent infringement.  And there’s not much other information out there about this one.  Acquired this one on eBay as part of a box of various cameras.
– Photos of the camera:  front view

Kodak Instamatic X-15FKodak Instamatic X-15F – 1976-1988, uses 126 cartridges.  One of millions of Kodak Instamatics manufactured in the 1970s/80s.  This model was the last.  Purchased on eBay with nearly a fully exposed roll of film inside.
– Photos of the camera:  front view
– Photos made with the camera:  (found film blog post)

Kodak Colorburst 250Kodak Colorburst 250 – 1979-1982.  This camera used “instant” film packs, but after a lawsuit by Polaroid, the camera was no longer produced and everyone got their money back.  This came as part of a bundle of cameras I purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:  front view

Leica IIIcLeica IIIc – 1941 red shutter model.  During the war, it appears that Leica used some alternate material for their shutters, and they offered to replace them for free after the war.  As a result, relatively few remain.  However, when I tried to use mine, it turned out that the shutter material was completely porous, rendering the camera useless.  Trying to make it work is an ongoing project.  Read more here.
– Photos of the camera:  front view

Mansfield SkylarkMansfield Skylark – 1961, 35mm.  A rebadged Yamato Palmat Automatic.  A fixed-focus automatic-exposure viewfinder camera with a light-powered, coupled selenium meter, Mantar or 40mm lens.  Set the dial according to your film speed/type, and then it’s just point and shoot.
– Photos of the camera:  front view | angled view | rear view.
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr album | blog post.
Camera manual

Minolta Minoltina SMinolta Minoltina S – 1964 35mm leaf shutter camera; in its day, the world’s most compact 35mm rangefinder camera with coupled exposure metering.  This one came in a box of mixed cameras and the shutter dial didn’t work, but I took it apart and fixed it and it turned out to be a pretty good shooter.
– Photos of the camera:  front view.
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr album | blog post

Minolta SRT101Minolta SR-T-101 – SLR manufactured between 1966 and 1975.
– Photos of the camera:  front view
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr album | blog post

Olympus PEN-EE SOlympus Pen EE-S – 1962-68.  Half-frame, “fully automatic” (you still have to set the focus ring) compact camera.  Uses a selenium ring around the lens to set aperture and shutter speed.  Has a social security number engraved on the bottom – read the blog post below to find out more.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr album | blog post
Camera manual

Petri 7S Petri 7s– 1963-76.  Rangefinder produced by the renamed (to Petri) Kuribayashi company.  Light meter connected to a light sensor that forms a ring around the lens to ensure accuracy, and to allow the use of filters which cover both the lens and the light sensor.  A gift from my mother-in-law and her husband.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr album | blog post
Camera manual

Polaroid model 95 land cameraPolaroid 95   1948.  The first of the instant photo “Land cameras”.  This one is marked as U.S. Navy property.  And it weighs a ton.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angled side view
– Film no longer available.

Stereo RealistRealist f3.5/1041 (“Stereo-Realist”)  These were manufactured from 1947 to 1971, but this one (SN A75563) is from around 1952.  A cleverly-designed camera that uses dual lenses and dual rangefinders to produce “stereo” photos that can be viewed as 3-D photos through a viewer produced by the same company.  This is the same principle used by Fisher-Price Viewmasters, only using 35mm slides instead of the much smaller Viewmaster transparencies.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera:

Ricoh 500Ricoh 500  1957-1960, uses 35mm film.  Unique camera with a fast “bayonet” film advance, dual focus lever, and linked speed and aperture dials, allowing the user to move them in unison for a given light situation.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera: Flickr set

Ricoh Kr-5Ricoh KR-5, 1975.  Uses 35mm film and has an exposure meter; the rest is fully manual.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera: blog post, Kr-5 | Flickr set
Camera manual

Ricoh KR-5 Super IIRicoh Kr-5 Super II, 1993-?.  Uses 35mm film and has an exposure meter; the rest is fully manual.  I love this camera – though it’s barely vintage.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front angled view
– Photos made with the camera:  Flickr set
Camera manual

Rochester Camera Company Cycle Poco No. 3Rochester Camera Company Cycle Poco No. 3 .  Made between 1897 and 1903, uses 4×5 inch film sheets and still works! Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view | front angled view
– Photos made with the camera: blog post

 

Rolls Rollax 50mmRolls Rollax 50mm1939 or 1940.  A novelty bakelite camera produced by a company that quickly went out of business, possibly as a result of a patent infringement lawsuit.  The camera uses 127 film.  Not much is available on the company itself.  A unique characteristic of this camera is the fact that it stores a spare roll of film inside the camera.
– Photos of the camera: front view
– Photos made with the camera:

Samyang Quicktouch  Not a lot of information about this camera. Samyang is a Korean company founded in 1972 that manufactures lenses; apparently they made at least one camera.  This came with a roll of film inside that the user thought had been exposed – but had not. Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera:
– Photos made with the camera:

Seneca Box ScoutSeneca Scout No. 2A– Box camera manufactured from 1913 to 1925.  More complicated than most (multiple aperture settings in addition to a timed setting), this loaded from the side with “Vulcan No. 232” film, the same size as 116 film. Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angled view | front view | side view
– Photos made with the camera:
Camera manual

Spartus RocketSpartus Rocket – 1962, uses 127 film.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front view
(Photos made with the camera)

Yashica TL-electroYashica TL-Electro – 1972 35mm single-lens reflex.  Mine came with a 2x lens converter and a Super-Takumar 1:3.5/135 lens.  It came missing the film winder knob, but these can apparently be had on eBay and one is on the way.  We’ll see if it works.  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: front angled view
– Photos made with the camera:
Camera manual

Zeiss Ikon Ikonta A/521Zeiss Ikon Ikonta A / 521 – 1940-1956 was the range for these cameras, but based on the fact that it produces 16 4.5×6 cm exposures per roll of 120 film, AND it has a 75mm/f3.5 Tessar lens and Compur Rapid shutter, lead me to believe this one was manufactured during the war, sometime before the factory in Dresden was destroyed in Feb 1945.  So the question is, how did it get to the U.S.?  We may never know.  Mine is pretty battered – missing paint and a tiny pinhole or two in the bellows (repairable) but seems to be intact otherwise.
– Photos of the camera: front view | lens close-up
– Photos made with the camera: blog post 1
About the Zeiss Ikontas

Zeiss Ikon Ikonta 35Zeiss Ikon Ikonta 35 / Contina / 522/24 – 1948-1953, uses 35mm film.  Purchased on eBay.  Consumer camera manufactured in Germany after WWII that became a hit in military PXes.
– Photos of the camera: front view | lens close-up
– Photos made with the camera: blog post | Flickr set
About the Zeiss Ikontas

Movie Cameras

Keystone Americana model 773Keystone Americana K-773 1963 Standard 8mm camera with rotating turret. Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: angled side view

Kodak XL-55 Movie CameraKodak XL-55, 1972-1974, Super 8 camera designed to be used in low(er) light.  Sadly, in most of them the gears break when run after a long period of storage.  It even came with an unexposed roll of Super8 Kodachrome inside it!  But it would cost 50 bucks to expose and put on DVD.  Should I do it?  Purchased on eBay.
– Photos of the camera: side view | top view

Kodak Instamatic M4 Movie Camera – Around 1965, part of the “instamatic” line of products which included movie cameras that made everything easy for the user.  This was included in a box of cameras I picked up on eBay.  The camera, sadly does not work, but it had a roll of film inside it which was, sadly, Kodachrome.
– Photos of the camera:

Eugen Bauer 88DBauer 88D, 1958-1960.  An odd-looking Standard 8mm camera with a rotating turret. Came with an exposed roll of 8mm film inside – currently at Film Rescue International.  Given as a birthday gift by my daughter.
– Photos of the camera: front view | angled side view

Revere Eight Model 88Revere Model 88 Double 8 – Standard 8mm camera produced in 1940. Given as a birthday gift from my parents.
– Photos of the camera: front view | angled view 1 | angled view 2

 

3 Responses to Vintage Cameras

  1. vidhyaa says:

    head spinning :-), all the best keep buying…keep shooting

  2. linda swanson says:

    i got in another camera..your mother and father bought an old1910 kodac from me on tuesday..beautiful piece so hope you enjoy it…love your pictures ….linda swanson ..albany, oregon usa

  3. Tom (Admin) says:

    Thank you! You will see it listed here eventually, hopefully with photos i have taken using it!

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